Author Archives: sailstrait

About sailstrait

I am an archivist, historian and small boat sailor. Over the years have built several small boats, the most recent of which was a Medway Skiff. Since 2011 I have been skipper of "Ebony", a 1982 Halman 20. I sail in Northumberland Strait between Prince Edward Island and Nova Scotia. Member of the Charlottetown Yacht Club, PEI Sailing Association and the Northumberland Strait Yachting Association. I have also an interest in the history of the Charlottetown Yacht Club, Charlottetown Harbour, Northumberland Strait and the vessels that have sailed there over the years.

No better way to know Charlottetown…

Before aerial photography the production of a panoramic view was an artisanal effort and a result of considerable talent. In 1878 a view of Charlottetown was published, the first overall view of the city. It received favourable press notice  including the write-up below from the 11 July 1878 issue of the Semi-Weekly Patriot.

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Charlottetown and its vicinity. – We were shown yesterday a first rate picture of Charlottetown. We do not know how the artist got there, but the sketch seems to have been taken from an elevated position over the head of the Railway Wharf. You have a view of part of the harbor and all of the wharves. The steamer St. Lawrence is going to her wharf; while the Heather Belle has just started for Mount Stewart. Here and there are small crafts with all sails set or accompanied by oarsmen. Other vessels are lying at anchor or unloading at some of the wharves. You have also a view not only of the city , but of the suburbs as well. To the west is Victoria Park and the Government House, and away in the distance is St. Dunstan’s College. You recognize also, many of the beautiful residences and the well laid off grounds of those who live in the Royalty. The whole city also lies before you, and you have a view of our wide streets and our squares. On closer examination you find that not only are you able to recognize the different localities , but every house on each block. The Post Office, the Colonial Building and the Court House stand out prominently. There is no better way for a stranger to become acquainted with Charlottetown than to study this picture. It is the work of A. Ruger, an artist of experience and ability. Mr. Stoner is the gentleman who has undertaken the work. The picture is to be lithographed, and that in the course of a short time, Mr. Stoner will solicit subscriptions for it. We have no doubt that many of our townspeople will gladly avail themselves of the opportunity thus afforded of procuring a copy of the picture.

The panoramic views often gave more and better details than the early air photos and their accuracy is astounding.  I have written more about the panoramic views in an article for  Island Magazine No. 24 Fall/Winter 1988 pp.14-18, titled “Panorama for Sale: The Bird’s Eye Views of Prince Edward Island [available here].  Close-ups of the Charlottetown waterfront show how much has changed and, amazingly, how much still survives – even at a distance of almost a century and a half. The artist has included more than fifty vessels and watercraft; steamers, schooners, fully-rigged ships, ferries, tugs, sloops, rowboats, and sculls in the harbour waters or tied to wharves, attesting to the importance of the harbour to the city.  In this posting I examine some of the  waterfront details of the 1878 panoramic view. 

Connolly’s, Pownal and Lord’s Wharf

In 1878 this section of town was not only a site of commercial activity, it was also the high-rent district. The former military establishment at the west end of Water Street had been turned into premium lots on Haviland Street, and Dundas Esplanade curved around giving a fine, uninterrupted view of the harbour. Mansions such as the John Ings House at the corner of the Esplanade and the Lowden House at the corner of Haviland and Water (which remains today) spoke to the prosperity of the community. However, the beauty of the new lots was spoiled by the Owen Connolly pork-packing plant at the corner of Haviland and Sydney streets. On Water Street the majority of the houses have survived although the appearance of the large Sterling House on the north side of the street has been destroyed through an unsympathetic renovation into apartments. It is worth noting that the lot on the south west corner of Water and Pownal is vacant and research suggests that this lot had never been built on until this year.

Much of the business on the Connolly Wharves was in timber, and piles of wood can be seen on the wharf itself. The “tee” shaped Pownal Wharf is uncrowded with buildings in contrast to Lord’s wharf which has a more than a half-dozen structures lining the lane from Water Street to the wharf.  Just to the east of Lord’s Wharf is one of several “timber ponds” where large floating timbers were stored before shipping or milling.

Peake’s Wharves No. 1,2, & 3, Queen’s Wharf

The business concerns of the Peake Bros. firm dominated this section of the city. On the south side of Water Street the home of James Peake still stands while the handsome building on the corner of Water and Queen Streets (now the Merchantman Pub) housed his business. Across Water Street another row of brick business buildings also survives from this period. Peake’s No. 1 wharf (later Pickard’s coal wharf) was the location of a large number of two and three story warehouses testifying to the volume of mercantile traffic which passed through the port during the shipping season. Next to it was a more modest structure, the Queen’s Wharf, which was an extension of Queen Street and was one of the oldest wharves in the city. The Vessel moored on the east side of Peake’s No. 2 Wharf is believed to the the S.S. Prince Edward, an attempt by the shipowners of Charlottetown to move from wood, wind and water to steel and steam – an effort which was not a success. Two of the Peake Wharves are headed by Peake Street, later called Lower Water Street. This street, along with most of its surrounding buildings, disappeared with the development of DeBlois Bros. wholesalers and still later the Sheraton/Delta/Marriott/ Prince Edward Hotel. Several of the wooden houses on the south side of Water Street and the brick structures on the corner of Water the Queen Streets date from before 1878 and can be identified on  this view.

STEAM NAVIGATON WHARF, DUNCAN’S WHARF AND SHIPYARD, FERRY WHARF

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Although not perhaps the busiest wharf for shipping in 1878, the Prince Edward Island Steam Navigation Company Wharf was the main passenger entry for Charlottetown. Besides serving the regular steamers of the Company, the St. Lawrence and the Princess of Wales (which appear prominently in the panoramic views of both Charlottetown and Summerside), it was also the terminal for coastal steamers, such as the Heather Belle, linking Charlottetown with Crapaud, West River, Mt. Stewart and Orwell. In addition the ships of the Quebec and Gulf Ports Steamship Company docked here as one of the ports on their service linking Quebec, and ports such as Miramichi, Shediac and Pictou. Duncan’s wharf was immediately adjacent and east of that the Duncan shipyard site which also served the timber and coal trades.

Another busy wharf was the Prince Street Wharf which was the Charlottetown end of ferry services across the harbour to Southport and to Rocky Point. The engraving shows the block and bridge construction which was used in many of the wharves of the period. To make these wharves a wooden frame was built and then filled with rock. A series of blocks would be joined by bridges. This construction pre-dated driven piles and reduced the pressure on the wharves as currents and tides could flow between the blocks. Owing to the re-development of the area few buildings survive from 1878. The exceptions are the Birnie house in the middle of the block and the Duncan House with its greenhouse at the S.E. corner of Water and Prince.

RAILWAY WHARF

As was the case with many cities the industrial east end was one of the busiest parts of the city. Just out of sight in this view is the gasworks which lay to the east where the electric plant was later located. The shops and yard of the Prince Edward Island Railway occupied land that had been filled in as the normal shoreline of the Hillsborough River almost reached Water Street in several places. Although engines for the railway were imported, much of the rolling stock for the railway was constructed in the car shops. The yard also housed the station, which the trains ran right through, freight handling sheds, and headquarters for railway operations. Many of the buildings shown in this view were destroyed in a fire in 1905. The current Founders Hall was built in a similar location in 1906 to replace the shops shown. here. One of the survivors from the 1905 fire is the stone building now known as the brass shop. This structure is shown in this view as a two bay building in the middle of the rail yard just east of the roundhouse. Originally the building was twice as long but owning to the damage much of it was demolished after the fire and the building shortened. The arched openings for rail cars can still be seen at the east end of the structure. Note that the car shops were built almost at the water’s edge. The additional land at the present time is infill. Although the Railway Wharf is the only one connecting directly to rail access to the narrow-gauge line it was not one of the busier wharves in the city and is seldom mentioned in news reports. 

In contrast to the single working wharf of the present day, Charlottetown’s 1878 waterfront  had more than a dozen busy wharves handling goods coming onto and leaving the Island. Especially in the absence of cruise ships the claim of Charlottetown to be a port city is barely sustained by the presence of the occasional oil tanker or gravel carrier bringing these commodities to the province and export by ship of anything from Charlottetown is rare indeed.     

Postcards from the Sky: Aerial images of the Charlottetown Waterfront 1930- 2000

Before the invention of the airplane residents of Charlottetown would have had little idea of what their city looked like from the skies. In 1878 they got a hint of the City’s appearance with the publication of a panoramic view of the city1. The Semi-Weekly Patriot noted its publication ” We do not know how the artist got there but the sketch seems to have been taken from an elevated position over the the head of the Railway Wharf. You have a view of part of the harbor and all of the wharves.” More on this view will be the subject of an upcoming blog posting.

Real aerial images were taken of the city in the late 1920s by the Royal Canadian Air Force but these would not have been freely available to the general public. Instead they had to wait for images of the city to be published as postcards. Over the years from the late 1930s to the present a number of air photos of the city were made available. Unfortunately the quality of postcard images had deteriorated considerably from the cards of the golden age of postcards in the years before the beginning of the Great Depression. Nevertheless these cards are one of the better sources to document the changing nature of the Charlottetown waterfront over the last eighty years.

Click on any highlighted text to see pages dedicated to the history of the wharf or company.

Charlottetown. P.E. Island. Photo Gelantine Engraving Company, Ottawa [PECO] card #12

This appears to be the earliest air photo of the Charlottetown waterfront to appear on a postcard. It shows a city not much changed since the years immediately following the publication of Meacham’s Atlas in 1880.2 While the names attached to several of the wharves changed over the years their basic configuration did not.

Charlottetown Waterfront, P.E. Island. Photo Gelantine Engraving Company, Ottawa [PECO] card No. 21

This detailed view was obviously taken at the same time as the more distant card above and can be dated before 1938. It shows an industrial waterfront in the closing days of the the age of sail. The Charlottetown Yacht Club clubhouse at Lords Wharf has not yet made its appearance although a number of small boats can be seen moored to the sheltered east side of Pownal Wharf. Indeed small craft can be seen at almost all of the wharves. The lot at the head of Pownal Wharf appears to be cleared for erection of the Eastern Hay and Feed Warehouse which was opened in 1940 and the rail spur which was extended along Lower Water Street does not appear to have been built. Judging by the number of warehouses Pownal Wharf seems to be in active use although no large ships can be seen there. Pickard’s Coal Wharf to the east is busier with at least three schooners tied to the wharf. Next is Queen’s Wharf , one of the smallest in the city but it has a vessel tied to each face of the wharf. At the Buntain and Bell Wharf with its distinctive warehouse a large schooner is either arriving or departing. The Marine and Fisheries wharf is quiet with all of the vessels stationed there on patrol although several smaller craft can be seen hauled out on the marine railway between that wharf and Buntain and Bell. The MacDonald Rowe woodworking plant can be seen just to the west of the end of Great George Street. In contrast with the neat and tidy arrangements on the Marine and Fisheries Wharf the Steam Navigation Wharf is a jumble of warehouses and out buildings (more than a dozen), most of which were associated with Bruce Stewart and Company’s industrial operations. Although the regular steamer service provided by the Harland had come to an end this was one of the busier wharves in the city. Between it and the Ferry Wharf at Prince Street another coal yard was in operation. Beside the Ferry Wharf itself a small building can be seen, probably the Hillsborough Boating Club building. Note how close the shoreline is to the railway shop building, now Founders Hall.

Aerial View, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada N.F.B. Photo
Version 2

EPSON MFP image

The Photo Gelantine Engraving Company of Ottawa [PECO] has a well-deserved reputation for poor quality of colouring and reproduction and the card above is one of the worst. Luckily, thanks to Phil Culhane’s excellent site at peipistcards.ca an uncoloured version, also published by PECO is available. With additional clarity enough information can be gleaned from this view of the waterfront to date it from about 1952. In this view Dundas Esplanade has not yet been gobbled up by the expanding Charlottetown Hospital. Paoli’s Wharf is no longer in use and his begun its long deterioration which continues to this day. Some of the structures have disappeared from Pownal wharf and the Charlottetown Yacht Club occupies the area although Pownal Wharf itself still extends to the channel giving good protection for a number of moored yachts. Further along the scene is much the same as in the pre-war view. However, there is a distinct absence of shipping at the several wharves. Queen’s Wharf appears to be abandoned and crumbling.

Aerial View of Charlottetown. The Capital City of Prince Edward Island. Population 18,000. Aerial Photo by Maritime Skyways, Ltd. Published by the Book Room Halifax # BR-652

This image from the south appears to date from the early 1960s. The air photo has poor resolution but sufficient detail can be gleaned to pick out a number of features. The addition to the PEI Hospital appears on the left. Along the waterfront from the west we can see that the Pownal Wharf has been cleared of the salt shed and warehouses and is now much shorter than in earlier views. Pickard’s coal wharf seems intact but the stub of Queen’s Wharf does not appear to be in use. Next to it the Buntain and Bell Wharf has at least one smaller vessel tied up. The Marine wharf is the busiest in the harbour with Coast Guard vessels on both sides. At the foot of Great George Street the former Steam Navigation Wharf is now being used as the Texaco terminal although only four tanks have built at this date. The northern end of the wharf still houses several of the Bruce Stewart & Co. buildings. The tanker mooring structures still standing off the Confederation Landing Park date from this period. The Prince Street Ferry Wharf has deteriorated as the service to Rocky Point was halted with the completion of the West River Causeway at New Dominion in 1958. Infill has pushed the shoreline south from the railway yards and structures. A freighter can be seen at the east side of the Railway Wharf.

Historic City of Charlottetown P.E.I. Premiere Post Card. No 21793R. Alex Wilson Publications. Distributed by Atlantic Imports, Kensington, P.E.I. Photo by George Hunter.
Charlottetown The Capital City of Prince Edward Island. Cavalier Postcard # 14891R . Alex Wilson Publications. Distributed by Island Wholesale Kinlock P.E.I. Photo by George Hunter

Although differing in production qualities and distributed by different entities the two cards above are both by the same photographer, George Hunter, and were taken on the same flight. Although the wharf detail is not clear in some cases both cards show identical vessels tied up at the Railway Wharf. With shots taken from the west the cards show details which do not often appear in postcards. The Armories on Kent Street are prominent in the top card which also shows West Kent School which was demolished in 1966 to make way for the government office complex. The card itself dates from after 1978 but the image is more than a decade earlier. The entire block bounded by Haviland Street, Water Street, Sidney Street and the harbour is occupied by the Charlottetown Hospital, the School of Nursing and the Sacred Heart Home. Dundas Esplanade which appears on earlier postcards has completely disappeared. H.M.C.S. Queen Charlotte is located on what had been the upper section of Connolly’s or Paoli’s Wharf while the wharf itself is in complete ruins. The large City Barn can be seen just north of the Yacht Club. The new Department of Transport Wharf is under construction, incorporating Pickard’s Coal Wharf, the ruin of Queen’s Wharf and the Buntain and Bell Wharf. To the east of the new construction the Marine and Fisheries Wharf is still in use and the former Steam Navigation Wharf now sports an additional two tanks for Texaco Oil. The ruins of the Ferry Wharf lie to the west of the Railway Wharf.

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada .Premiere Post Card. No 23187R Alex Wilson Publications. Distributed by Atlantic Imports, Kensington, P.E.I. Photo by George Hunter.

The re-development of the Charlottetown waterfront in the 1970s and 1980s brought more changes to the area than the previous half-century. One of these changes was the development of Harbourside on the site of post-industrial buildings on the waterlots south of Water Street. This 1978 image centers on the Charlottetown Yacht Club where almost all vessels were still moored off and were reached by dinghies or the club tender. The club building itself had been enlarged with an extension and deck which house a bar for members and guests. The dinghy launch ramp and the jetty at the stub end of the Pownal Wharf provided landing spots. The Department of Transport Wharf has been completed and is in use and the apartments and commercial spaces north and east of the yacht club are being landscaped.

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island Published by Allied Sales Charlottetown Card No. PEI21H. Photo by Ron Garnett.

This image was taken after the completion of the Harbourside buildings and shows the Yacht Club Property before the addition of the marina although some fingers have been added to the inner basin protected by a floating barrier which eventually sank and remains close to the end of Lord’s Wharf. The hotel and convention centre occupy the foot of Queen Street and the Marine and Fisheries wharf is still in place to the east. The Texaco tank farm is still in use and Confederation Landing Park has not yet been built.

Peake’s Wharf. Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island Published by Allied Sales Charlottetown Card No. PEI34H. Photo by Ron Garnett.

Although this photograph is from the same source it follows the previous one by several years. The removal of the Texaco tank farm paved the way for the development of the 6 acre Confederation Landing Park which was completed in 1995.This image dates before that project but does show the major 1990 development at Peake’s Quay following the removal of the Marine and Fisheries Wharf. At the Charlottetown Yacht Club the inner basin marina (the ‘hood) has been developed.

Notes:

  1. See H.T. Holman “Panorama for Sale: The Bird’s Eye Views of Prince Edward Island” The Island Magazine No. 24 (Fall/Winter 1988) pp. 14-18. Can be downloaded from this site: https://www.islandimagined.ca/articles
  2. A series of fine articles on the creation and publishing of the Meacham’s Atlas have recently appeared in Reg Porter’s blog found here

Postcards from the Sky: Aerial images of the Charlottetown Waterfront 1930- 2000

Before the invention of the airplane residents of Charlottetown would have had little idea of what their city looked like from the skies. In 1878 they got a hint of the City’s appearance with the publication of a panoramic view of the city1. The Semi-Weekly Patriot noted its publication ” We do not know how the artist got there but the sketch seems to have been taken from an elevated position over the the head of the Railway Wharf. You have a view of part of the harbor and all of the wharves.” More on this view will be the subject of an upcoming blog posting.

Real aerial images were taken of the city in the late 1920s by the Royal Canadian Air Force but these would not have been freely available to the general public. Instead they had to wait for images of the city to be published as postcards. Over the years from the late 1930s to the present a number of air photos of the city were made available. Unfortunately the quality of postcard images had deteriorated considerably from the cards of the golden age of postcards in the years before the beginning of the Great Depression. Nevertheless these cards are one of the better sources to document the changing nature of the Charlottetown waterfront over the last eighty years.

Click on any highlighted text to see pages dedicated to the history of the wharf or company.

Charlottetown. P.E. Island. Photo Gelantine Engraving Company, Ottawa [PECO] card #12

This appears to be the earliest air photo of the Charlottetown waterfront to appear on a postcard. It shows a city not much changed since the years immediately following the publication of Meacham’s Atlas in 1880.2 While the names attached to several of the wharves changed over the years their basic configuration did not.

Charlottetown Waterfront, P.E. Island. Photo Gelantine Engraving Company, Ottawa [PECO] card No. 21

This detailed view was obviously taken at the same time as the more distant card above and can be dated before 1938. It shows an industrial waterfront in the closing days of the the age of sail. The Charlottetown Yacht Club clubhouse at Lords Wharf has not yet made its appearance although a number of small boats can be seen moored to the sheltered east side of Pownal Wharf. Indeed small craft can be seen at almost all of the wharves. The lot at the head of Pownal Wharf appears to be cleared for erection of the Eastern Hay and Feed Warehouse which was opened in 1940 and the rail spur which was extended along Lower Water Street does not appear to have been built. Judging by the number of warehouses Pownal Wharf seems to be in active use although no large ships can be seen there. Pickard’s Coal Wharf to the east is busier with at least three schooners tied to the wharf. Next is Queen’s Wharf , one of the smallest in the city but it has a vessel tied to each face of the wharf. At the Buntain and Bell Wharf with its distinctive warehouse a large schooner is either arriving or departing. The Marine and Fisheries wharf is quiet with all of the vessels stationed there on patrol although several smaller craft can be seen hauled out on the marine railway between that wharf and Buntain and Bell. The MacDonald Rowe woodworking plant can be seen just to the west of the end of Great George Street. In contrast with the neat and tidy arrangements on the Marine and Fisheries Wharf the Steam Navigation Wharf is a jumble of warehouses and out buildings (more than a dozen), most of which were associated with Bruce Stewart and Company’s industrial operations. Although the regular steamer service provided by the Harland had come to an end this was one of the busier wharves in the city. Between it and the Ferry Wharf at Prince Street another coal yard was in operation. Beside the Ferry Wharf itself a small building can be seen, probably the Hillsborough Boating Club building. Note how close the shoreline is to the railway shop building, now Founders Hall. The eastern approaches to the city are dominated by the tank farms of Imperial Oil and Irving.

Aerial View, Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada N.F.B. Photo

The Photo Gelantine Engraving Company of Ottawa [PECO] has a well-deserved reputation for poor quality of colouring and reproduction and the card above is one of the worst. However enough information can be gleaned from this view of the waterfront to date it from about 1952. In this view Dundas Esplanade has not yet been gobbled up by the expanding Charlottetown Hospital. Paoli’s Wharf is no longer in use and his begun its long deterioration which continues to this day. Some of the structures have disappeared from Pownal wharf and the Charlottetown Yacht Club occupies the area although Pownal Wharf itself still extends to the channel giving good protection for a number of moored yachts. Further along the scene is much the same as in the pre-war view. However, there is a distinct absence of shipping at the several wharves. Queen’s Wharf appears to be abandoned and crumbling.

Aerial View of Charlottetown. The Capital City of Prince Edward Island. Population 18,000. Aerial Photo by Maritime Skyways, Ltd. Published by the Book Room Halifax # BR-652

This image from the south appears to date from the early 1960s. The air photo has poor resolution but sufficient detail can be gleaned to pick out a number of features. The addition to the PEI Hospital appears on the left. Along the waterfront from the west we can see that the Pownal Wharf has been cleared of the salt shed and warehouses and is now much shorter than in earlier views. Pickard’s coal wharf seems intact but the stub of Queen’s Wharf does not appear to be in use. Next to it the Buntain and Bell Wharf has at least one smaller vessel tied up. The Marine wharf is the busiest in the harbour with Coast Guard vessels on both sides. At the foot of Great George Street the former Steam Navigation Wharf is now being used as the Texaco terminal although only four tanks have built at this date. The northern end of the wharf still houses several of the Bruce Stewart & Co. buildings. The tanker mooring structures still standing off the Confederation Landing Park date from this period. The Prince Street Ferry Wharf has deteriorated as the service to Rocky Point was halted with the completion of the West River Causeway at New Dominion in 1958. Infill has pushed the shoreline south from the railway yards and structures. A freighter can be seen at the east side of the Railway Wharf.

Historic City of Charlottetown P.E.I. Premiere Post Card. No 21793R. Alex Wilson Publications. Distributed by Atlantic Imports, Kensington, P.E.I. Photo by George Hunter.
Charlottetown The Capital City of Prince Edward Island. Cavalier Postcard # 14891R . Alex Wilson Publications. Distributed by Island Wholesale Kinlock P.E.I. Photo by George Hunter

Although differing in production qualities and distributed by different entities the two cards above are both by the same photographer, George Hunter, and were taken on the same flight. Although the wharf detail is not clear in some cases both cards show identical vessels tied up at the Railway Wharf. With shots taken from the west the cards show details which do not often appear in postcards. The Armories on Kent Street are prominent in the top card which also shows West Kent School which was demolished in 1966 to make way for the government office complex. The card itself dates from after 1978 but the image is more than a decade earlier. The entire block bounded by Haviland Street, Water Street, Sidney Street and the harbour is occupied by the Charlottetown Hospital, the School of Nursing and the Sacred Heart Home. Dundas Esplanade which appears on earlier postcards has completely disappeared. H.M.C.S. Queen Charlotte is located on what had been the upper section of Connolly’s or Paoli’s Wharf while the wharf itself is in complete ruins. The large City Barn can be seen just north of the Yacht Club. The new Department of Transport Wharf is under construction, incorporating Pickard’s Coal Wharf, the ruin of Queen’s Wharf and the Buntain and Bell Wharf. To the east of the new construction the Marine and Fisheries Wharf is still in use and the former Steam Navigation Wharf now sports an additional two tanks for Texaco Oil. The ruins of the Ferry Wharf lie to the west of the Railway Wharf and tank farms for both Imperial Oil and Irving dominate the eastern entrance to the city from the Hillsborough Bridge.

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada .Premiere Post Card. No 23187R Alex Wilson Publications. Distributed by Atlantic Imports, Kensington, P.E.I. Photo by George Hunter.

The re-development of the Charlottetown waterfront in the 1970s and 1980s brought more changes to the area than the previous half-century. One of these changes was the development of Harbourside on the site of post-industrial buildings on the waterlots south of Water Street. This 1978 image centers on the Charlottetown Yacht Club where almost all vessels were still moored off and were reached by dinghies or the club tender. The club building itself had been enlarged with an extension and deck which house a bar for members and guests. The dinghy launch ramp and the jetty at the stub end of the Pownal Wharf provided landing spots. The Department of Transport Wharf has been completed and is in use and the apartments and commercial spaces north and east of the yacht club are being landscaped.

Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island Published by Allied Sales Charlottetown Card No. PEI21H. Photo by Ron Garnett.

This image was taken after the completion of the Harbourside buildings and shows the Yacht Club Property before the addition of the marina although some fingers have been added to the inner basin protected by a floating barrier which eventually sank and remains close to the end of Lord’s Wharf. The hotel and convention centre occupy the foot of Queen Street and the Marine and Fisheries wharf is still in place to the east. The Texaco tank farm is still in use and Confederation Landing Park has not yet been built.

Peake’s Wharf. Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island Published by Allied Sales Charlottetown Card No. PEI34H. Photo by Ron Garnett.

Although this photograph is from the same source it follows the previous one by several years. The removal of the Texaco tank farm paved the way for the development of the 6 acre Confederation Landing Park which was completed in 1995.This image dates before that project but does show the major 1990 development at Peake’s Quay following the removal of the Marine and Fisheries Wharf. At the Charlottetown Yacht Club the inner basin marina (the ‘hood) has been developed.

Notes:

  1. See H.T. Holman “Panorama for Sale: The Bird’s Eye Views of Prince Edward Island” The Island Magazine No. 24 (Fall/Winter 1988) pp. 14-18. Can be downloaded from this site: https://www.islandimagined.ca/articles
  2. A series of fine articles on the creation and publishing of the Meacham’s Atlas have recently appeared in Reg Porter’s blog found here